Category: montgomery county

Burnt Mills West Special Park Ghost Expedition 2018 /Montgomery…

Burnt Mills West Special Park Ghost Expedition 2018 /Montgomery County (“What’s the Spirit Thing”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“What’s the Spirit Thing”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Burnt Mills West Special Park [Silver Spring MD] Ghost Expedition Sep 29-30 2018. Series of response streams received before the formal start of National Ghost Hunting Day.  Communicators were discussing the function of the P-SB7 ITC device after one had asked (“What’s the Spirit Thing”). Audio was captured with a Kinect for Windows SLS Sensor.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer; TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Ghost Expedition and Demonstration Montgomery County,…

Ghost Expedition and Demonstration Montgomery County, Gaithersburg Maryland: Kentlands Mansion and Arts Barn

The Tschiffely-Kent estate in Montgomery County and present day Gaithersburg MD is situated on land that was originally called “Quince Orchard” that was once held by the Claggett family

The land was bequeathed to the sons of Henry Claggett, Joseph and Zechariah Claggett, through his last will and testament in 1778.  However only Joseph resided on the land which had expanded to 100 acres by the time of his death.  After Joseph’s death, ownership passed to his heirs in 1829

Frederick A. Tschiffely acquired the property in 1852.  Although he was in the wholesale pharmaceuticals business, he operated the estate as farm.  He was married to Elizabeth Ann Wilson Tschiffely. Their children were: Frederick Jr; Elberta; Elgar; Albert; Catherine; Elizabeth; Wilson; Linda; Kate; and James.  Upon his death in 1892, his son Frederick Jr inherited the farm

Following the death of his mother in 1900, Frederick A. Tschiffely Jr tore down the existing house to build the present day mansion and outbuildings, all of which were constructed in brick.  The estate was called Wheatlands, a reference to the wheat and corn grown on the farm.  As farming declined the land was used for pasture for cows, sheep and race horses.  Portions of the property were also used as a stone quarry

Dr. Frederick A. Tschiffely Jr was a pharmacist who owned a wholesale drug store in Washington DC and kept many pharmaceuticals at his house. When area residents needed prescriptions filled, they would come to his house, which they sometimes referred to as “The Bricks”  

Dr. Tschiffely was married to Dolly Brown Tschiffely.  Their children were: Clifton; Charles; Ora; Dolly; Stuart; Douglas; Claude; Cecil.  The Wheatlands farm was operated by Upton Burris, an overseer who lived on the farm.  After his death in 1931, the property passed to his his oldest sons and daughters

In 1942, Otis Beall Kent, a prominent attorney from Washington DC, acquired the property from the Tschiffely heirs and renamed the estate Kentlands Farm. He made several changes to the house to suit his architectural tastes and to house his collections of Persian rugs, musical instruments, and art.  He also altered and added to the outbuildings, to include the construction of his own fire house and an underground shelter which could accommodate up to fifty persons

Mr. Kent was an early proponent of wildlife preservation.  Toward this end, he constructed gardens, lanes, hedgerows, dams and ponds as habitats for birds and game at the estate. He also gifted land to the National Geographic Society and the Izaak Walton League to develop a wildlife sanctuary.  He was a lifelong bachelor and he passed away in 1972. He left his estate to his adopted daughter Helene Danger Kent

In 1978, representatives of Kent’s estate created the Kentland Foundation with 162 acres. On May 26, 1988, Helene Kent sold Kentlands to the Great Seneca Limited Partnership to develop varieties of housing for area residents to include apartments, townhomes and single family homes

The Kentlands mansion and outbuildings were gifted to the City of Gaithersburg in 1992 and were since renovated into cultural facilities.  The Kentlands Mansion now serves as an art gallery and venue that host weddings, parties and business events.  The Arts Barn houses studios for artists in residence and a 99-seat theater

The mansion appears to have a haunted reputation.  Paranormal encounters have been reported as far back as 1942 and continue to a lesser extent through the present.  These include: apparitions of women in Victorian-era dress and sightings or sensed-presence encounters involving the late Mr. Kent; as well as imitative sounds to include footsteps and groans  

Other paranormal type encounters have involved various electrical and physical anomalies such as: object displacements; lights and door movements on the 3rd floor; radios operating without power; and self-activation of music boxes

The ghost expedition and demonstration will attempt to obtain “drop-in” communications connected to the mansion’s history and its residents and evidence of a haunting during the Ghosts of Gaithersburg event

REFERENCES:

City Facilities: Arts Barn. (2018). City of Gaithersburg

City Facilities: Kentlands Mansion. (2018). City of Gaithersburg

Deines, A., Hahn R. and Hooper, C. (1989). Natl Register of Historic Places Nomination: Kentlands Mansion. M21/6. Wheatlands, F.A. Tschiffely Farm (Kentlands). Maryland Historical Trust 

Arts on the Green: Ghosts of Gaithersburg. (2018). City of Gaithersburg

History of Kentlands Mansion. (2018). City of Gaithersburg

Kentlands History and Future. (2018). Kentlands Community Foundation

Reppert, R. (1960, Mar 20). A Fire Department All His Own: Otis Beall Kent Likes To Do What Pleases Him, And Buying Up Fire Engines Is One Thing That Does. The Baltimore Sun

IMAGES:

Front view of Frederick A. Tschiffely, Jr.’ s house , built circa. 1900. Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Tschiffely barn, built circa 1900. (c 1920). Gaithersburg Then and Now

Frederick Adolphus Tschiffely Jr. Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Charles Stott Tschiffely. Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Front porch of the Tschiffely home. From left to right are : Clifton Tschiffely, his wife, Lacey Tschiffely, their daughter Dorothy, Dorothy’s daughter, Dolly Tschiffely, Frederick A. Tschiffely, Jr., unknown, Harvey Wiley, and unknown. (c 1920). Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

F.A. Tschiffely Family Outing in 1907. (1907, Jun 9). Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Mower., photographer. (1975, Feb 26). Tschiffely-Kent Mansion. Brick Barn. Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Arts on the Green: Ghosts of Gaithersburg. (2018). City of Gaithersburg

Mower., photographer. (1975, Feb 26). Tschiffely-Kent Mansion. Courtesy City of Gaithersburg

Ghost Expedition Montgomery County, Silver Spring Maryland:…

Ghost Expedition Montgomery County, Silver Spring Maryland: Burnt Mills West Special Park/Robert B Morse Water Filtration Plant

The Burnt Mills area in Silver Spring, Maryland takes it name from a mill that was said to have burned down there sometime before 1788.  From an antique copper stencil, veteran local journalist J. Harry Shannon (aka “The Rambler”) suggested in 1916 the burnt mill may have been known as “Glen Cairn Mills Family Flour

Milling operations in Burnt Mills date to 1745 when then area was patented as the Mill Seat.  The area’s terrain and rapid waterfalls enabled the operations of a series of grist, saw and flour mills.  

The earliest records of a flour mill at Burnt Mills date to 1803 when the property known as “Beall’s Industry” was sold by Walter Beall to Peter Kemp and James William Perry  

Nathan Lufborough acquired the flour mill and land, described in an 1823 deed as “one hundred acres more or less”.  He had intended to sell the mill in 1847 but he died before the sale could be completed, leaving the property to his heirs 

The flour mill at Burnt Mills was owned by James L. Bond from 1858 to 1886.  Bond sold the property to his sons-in law.  The last owner was Dr. George W. Bready who acquired the flour mill and land in 1906

In 1913, The Rambler rendered the following portrait of the old flour mill in the Sunday Star

The shingle roof of the mill is green, dark and old, with moss, but  nearly everything else about the mill – the miller, of course, included –  is whitened by the flour and meal ground there, and which has been grinding there so long that no man’s memory runneth to the contrary  

Near the mill is the miller’s house, bowered in the shade of numerous  close-growing trees and the home of Dr. William T. Brown, surrounded by  shrubbery, orchard and vineyard

The mill produced three grades of flour and stone-ground corn mill. The technology of the mill improved over time. A roller mill replaced mill stones around 1895. A turbine replaced the wheel in 1911 

In 1922 the mill was sold to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) and was subsequently demolished in 1928.  After the mill had closed, it was briefly used by the Boy Scouts as a meeting hall

In 1879, Burnt Mills (Four Corners) was a farm community with a population of 125 persons.  In 1934, the Robert E. Lattimer Land Company developed the area as a community of country estates known as Burnt Mills Hills.  The development preserved the area’s topography of rolling hills and streams and farm lanes

WSSC began construction of a water filtration facility in 1930.  The plant featured a “state of art” design, by WSSC Chief Engineer Robert B. Morse, for rapid sand removal and water treatment.  The plant had two filter assemblies, two pumping stations and a new concrete dam.  Pumping stations were designed in the Georgian Revival style to give the appearance of large colonial houses rather than a public utility

  • The low-lift pumping station moved cleaned (sediment free-water) to filter assemblies where lime and ammonia were added
  • The filter assemblies featured circular rings that were used for each stage of the filtration process, which included coagulation, filtration, and delivery

The late Robert Brooks Morse (1880-1936) was married to Carrie Emma Ross-Morse (1883-1979). They had two children: Caroline Allen Morse (1903-1905) and Katherine B. Morse-Devereaux (1904-1984)

  • He was trained as a civil engineer at Johns Hopkins University (A.B. 1901) and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.B. 1904).  He became Chief engineer at WSSC since its inception in 1918
  • Unfortunately, he died prematurely at age 55 due to blood poisoning, months before the water filtration plant opened.  WSSC named the water filtration plant in his honor

The water filtration plant did not have the capacity to meet rising service demands from suburban growth and it was closed in 1962. The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission acquired the former water plant in 2000.  Today they are recreational facilities known as Burnt Mills West Special Park (the high-lift pumping station) and Burnt Mills East Special Park (the low-lift pumping station)

There are no haunting legends associated with historical Burnt Mills nor the Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Facility. However, there may be potential for transcommunication experiences owing to area history.  The ghost expedition will focus on “drop-in” communication,

and not on evidence for a haunting

The ghost expedition will also participate in National Ghost Hunting Day (NGHD), an event sponsored by Haunted Journeys magazine.  Connectivity and live streaming will be provided by SHINDIG. Digital marketing services for the event are being provided by CyberSpyder. The event will attempt to build a global “consciousness bridge” that will last two hours

Data from random event generators (REGs) belonging to the Global Consciousness Project  (GCP) that are in proximity to participant locations will be monitored over the event. 

REFERENCES:

Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. Hosted at archive.org

Boyd, T.H.S. (1879). The history of Montgomery County, Maryland – From its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Baltimore, W.K. Boyle and Son

Bushong, W. (1994, May). Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant. M33-22. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Maryland Historical Trust

Find A Grave, database and images. Memorial page for Robert Brooks Morse (13 Sep 1880–31 Jan 1936), Find A Grave Memorial no. 135832899, citing Chebeague Island Cemetery, Chebeague Island, Cumberland County, Maine, USA. Maintained by townsendburial (contributor 47629974)

Historic Preservation, Montgomery County, Maryland. (1996, Mar 6). Montgomery County Atlas (MCATLAS) Map Viewer: ROBERT B. MORSE COMPLEX (WSSC). Resource Number: 33/022-000A. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Montgomery County, Maryland

Kelly, C.L. (2012). Burnt Mills Hills. M33-29. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Maryland Historical Trust

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND HISTORICAL CHRONOLOGY. (2018). Maryland State Archives

Montgomery Parks. (2016, Aug 15). Burnt Mills West Special Park. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission

Montgomery County Planning Department. Montgomery County Atlas (MCATLAS) Map Viewer: Burnt Mills West Special Park. Montgomery County (MD). Department of Parks. Montgomery County, Maryland

National Ghost Hunting Day: The World’s Largest Ghost Hunt. (2018).  Haunted Journeys

Shannon, J.H. (1913, Jun 22). With the Rambler. Sunday Star, Washington DC.  Reprinted in Neighbors of the Northwest Branch

Shannon, J.H. (1916, May 14).  With the Rambler: Tramping the Northwest Branch. Sunday Star, Washington DC.  Reprinted in Neighbors of the Northwest Branch

Sutton, R. (2016, Jun 16). Burnt Mills Dam has a long history in Montgomery County. Ross Sutton Blog. Keller Williams Real Estate

Williams, B.J. (2017).  Exploring Collective Consciousness: Could There Be Some Implications for Paranity?. National Ghost Hunting Day Collective Consciousness Article. Psychical Research Foundation

IMAGES:

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). REAR ELEVATION of high-lift pumping station. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). FRONT ELEVATION of high-lift pumping station. Colesville Road (also called U.S.Route 29 or Columbia Pike) is in foreground. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Burnt Mills Flour Mill prior to its demolition – Figure 1. (c 1928).  From Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. 

Hosted at archive.org

Burnt Mills Flour Mill prior to its demolition – Figure 2. (c 1928).  From Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. 

Hosted at archive.org

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). GROUND FLOOR of high-lift pumping station. Note the main stairway and columns. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). ATTIC of high-lift pumping station showing steel framing and concrete slab roof units. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). OFFICE SPACE ON SECOND FLOOR of high-lift pumping station. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). BASEMENT of high-lift pumping station. Note steel I-beam and pump foundations. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

National Ghost Hunting Day: The World’s Largest Ghost Hunt. (2017).  Haunted Journeys

Montgomery Parks. (2016, Aug 15). SOUTHEAST ELEVATION. Burnt Mills West Special Park. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission